Subjects — P

Philosophy Quotations

Unintelligible answers to insoluble problems.

The philosopher is like a man fasting in the midst of universal intoxication. He alone perceives the illusion of which all creatures are the willing playthings; he is less duped than his neighbor by his own nature. He judges more sanely, he sees things as they are. It is in this that his liberty consists — in the ability to see clearly and soberly, in the power of mental record.

Because philosophy arises from awe, a philosopher is bound in his way to be a lover of myths and poetic fables. Poets and philosophers are alike in being big with wonder.

The pursuit of what is true and the practice of what is good are the two most important objects of philosophy.

When he who hears does not know what he who speaks means, and when he who speaks does not know what he himself means, that is philosophy.

The traditional disputes of philosophers are, for the most part, as unwarranted as they are unfruitful.

We are much beholden to Machiavel and others, that write what men do, and not what they ought to do.

In it he proves that all things are true and states how the truths of all contradictions may be reconciled physically, such as for example that white is black and black is white; that one can be and not be at the same time; that there can be hills without valleys; that nothingness is something and that everything, which is, is not. But take note that he proves all these unheard-of paradoxes without any fallacious or sophistical reasoning.

Philosophy, n.: A route of many roads leading from nowhere to nothing.

Existentialism is about being a saint without God; being your own hero, without all the sanction and support of religion or society.