Subjects — L

Lincoln, Abraham Quotations

He saw Mr. Lincoln but once; at the melancholy function called an Inaugural Ball. Of course he looked anxiously for a sign of character. He saw a long, awkward figure; a plain, ploughed face; a mind, absent in part, and in part evidently worried by white kid gloves; features that expressed neither self-satisfaction nor any other familiar Americanism, but rather the same painful sense of becoming educated and of needing education that tormented a private secretary, above all a lack of apparent force. Any private secretary in the least fit for his business would have thought, as Adams did, that no man living needed so much education as the new President but that all the education he could get would not be enough.

Lincoln, six feet one in his stocking feet, The lank man, knotty and tough as a hickory rail, Whose hands were always too big for white-kid gloves, Whose wit was a coonskin sack of dry, tall tales, Whose weathered face was homely as a plowed field.

Our children shall behold his fame, The kindly-earnest, brave, forseeing man, Sagacious, patient, dreading praise, not blame, New birth of our new soil, the first American.

I never see that man without feeling that he is one to become personally attach’d to, for his combination of purest, heartiest tenderness, and native western form of manliness.

Before you give up hope, turn back and read the attacks that were made on Lincoln.